Thursday, December 16, 2010

Not All Lavenders Are Created Equal

There was a time when didn't realize there was a difference between high end lavender and grocery store lavender. I figured that one had marketed itself more effectively and was able to put a higher price tag on the same product. While this happens more than it should, there are cavernous differences between "lavender", lavendin and lavendula angustifolia.

Let's break it down:

"Lavender": A lot of products in grocery stores with a "lavender" scent may not even have actual lavender in it. It's like "grape" gum. I've never tasted a real grape that smelled anything like grape-flavored gum but it's what the market has decided "grape" tastes like so that's what we've come to expect. Same goes for lavender. A lot of people out there (maybe even you!) have only encountered the most false versions of lavender and believe that you're allergic to or dislike the smell of lavender. If the ingredient deck says nothing of "lavendin" or some form of "lavandula", back away slowly and move on to something real.

Lavendin: Even though (or maybe because) Lavendin is a hybrid of lavandula angustifolia (often called True Lavender) and lavender spica (Spiky Lavender), it's a totally sterile plant that can't reproduce on its own. Despite its sterility, lavendin is by far the most prevalent form of lavender in soaps, toothpastes, everything because it smells so lovely. It has to be cloned, which is why most lavender fields you see look eerily symmetrical and tidy. Lavendin, however, doesn't guarantee all the healing properties that lavandula angustifolia provides, so OHA primarily uses lavendin to cover up the not-so-pleasant smelliness of unrefined olive oil, pumpkin seed oil and rose hip seed oil. It also does well at the basic lavender functions, like being antispasmodic and a stress reliever.

Lavandula Angustifolia (True Lavender): Ahhh, now the really good stuff. When other skin care companies use this variety of lavender, they dilute it like crazy because it's so expensive. This lavender is not skin sensitizing so it's safe for almost every skin type. The most precious sub-species of lavendula angustifolia is Population Lavender, grown from seeds in France. It is among the most therapeutically complex and beneficial lavender oils in the world. Talk about freakisly expensive, but OHA uses it because it's what's best for your skin. Different climates, altitudes, and even insects can affect the structure and therapeutic strengths of a lavender plant, so OHA sources lavender from all around the world, including the Pacific Northwest, Tasmania, France, Bulgaria, and the Himalayas. This guarantees that you get all the possible therapeutic benefits of lavender when you use OHA's skin care system. Why is that cool? See below:

Lavender Angustifolia's benefits include:

* treating eczema, psoriasis, burns, bronchial disorders, migraines, wounds, parasitic infection
* relaxant, sleep aid and stress reliever
* antibacterial, antispasmodic, a circulatory stimulant and antiseptic
* regulates skin functions and stimulates cellular growth and regeneration
* brings balance to all skin types, including acneic, dry, normal, sensitive and oily
* heals open wounds or surgical wounds
* it turns you and your friends into unicorns. I'm kidding. I just wanted to see you if you were still with me.

Enlightening stuff, eh? It just reminds me of what an honor it is to be using and working around the most beautiful ingredients available.

Tag : lavender,lavender essential oil,lavender plant,lavender oil

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